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HomenewsBetween January and March, Coyotes in Virginia May Be More Aggressive, So...

Between January and March, Coyotes in Virginia May Be More Aggressive, So Folks Should Be on the Lookout.

Coyotes May Be More Possessive This Time of Year.

My family and I have had two personal interactions with coyotes during the past decade, and sightings have grown in the southwest and central Virginia.
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A few years ago, my grandchildren and I spotted a coyote along the side of Route 220 in Roanoke County, Virginia, not far from the county line with Franklin.

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Last year, while strolling on the Lick Run Greenway between 10th street Northwest and Liberty Road, my eldest son spotted one of these animals making its way into the woods.

The Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources has issued a warning to residents of the Commonwealth of Virginia to exercise extreme caution if they come into contact with a coyote between the months of January and March, as this is mating season for the animals. This warning was reported by WRIC in Chesterfield County.
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Coyote Behavior is Notoriously Difficult to Predict.

I spotted a coyote in broad daylight on the side of the road, and it was completely undisturbed by the passing cars.

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The one my son saw in the afternoon was apparently headed into the woods and wasn’t paying any attention to him or his presence, according to his report.

Is any Other Helpful Data on Coyotes in Virginia?

Because they are “More challenged for food” in the winter, coyotes are more likely to attack small dogs, hence Fies advises against leaving any food outside.

In the months of March and April, known as “popping season,” larger canines will be especially hostile due to their protective and territorial nature toward their newborn pups.

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